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Statistical Analysis Of Small Structures In Rotated Crustal Blocks Near The Húsavík-Flatey Fault
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The right lateral Húsavík-Flatey fault in northern Iceland provides a unique opportunity to observe an oceanic transform fault on land. Structural and paleomagnetic measurements from lavas and dikes on Flateyjarskagi peninsula indicate that rocks adjacent to the fault have rotated clockwise more than 100°. I examine the effect of this rotation on the orientations of small faults and vein zones near the transform. https://aipgmn.org/meetinginfo.php?id=190&ts=1598639947

 Export to Your Calendar 11/2/2020
When: Monday, November 2, 2020
11:45 AM
Where: United States
Contact: Shanna Schmitt

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AIPG Minnesota Section Technical talks

Statistical Analysis Of Small Structures In Rotated Crustal Blocks Near The Húsavík-Flatey Fault, Northern Iceland!

November 02, 2020
11:45 AM to 1:00 PM

Webcast meeting

Research in Iceland from AIPG MN Section 2019 Student Scholarship Winner Natalie Hummel!

https://aipgmn.org/meetinginfo.php?id=190&ts=1598639947

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Statistical Analysis of Small Structures in Rotated Crustal Blocks near the Húsavík-Flatey Fault, Northern Iceland!

by Natalie Hummel, Carleton College

Presentation Abstract

The right lateral Húsavík-Flatey fault in northern Iceland provides a unique opportunity to observe an oceanic transform fault on land. Structural and paleomagnetic measurements from lavas and dikes on Flateyjarskagi peninsula indicate that rocks adjacent to the fault have rotated clockwise more than 100°. I examine the effect of this rotation on the orientations of small faults and vein zones near the transform. I also use patterns in small-scale data to build on models of the style of deformation surrounding the fault. Previous studies provide constraints on the extent of rotation across Flateyjarskagi, which I use to estimate the expected orientations of rotated structures. The orientations of some small faults are consistent with expected rotations, but many structures appear to post-date rotation. Rotation of an older subset of the small faults on Flateyjarskagi accounts for patterns that have previously been attributed to variations in the stress field near the transform.

Biography

Natalie Hummel graduated from Carleton College with a degree in geology in 2020. She has interests in structural geology, geophysics, and low temperature thermochronology. Natalie is presenting work from her undergraduate thesis, which she completed with Dr. Sarah Titus. This year, she is working on structural geology research as an Educational Associate for the Carleton Geology department while she applies to graduate schools.

Tickets

$5.00 AIPG Member

$10.00 Non-Member

$0.00 Student