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The term “Social License to Operate” (SLO) was originally adopted for use by the Canadian mining industry in the late 1990s, and referred to the concept that social permission was needed for a mining company to conduct its operations, for example from local communities or indigenous people. Since then, the premise of the SLO has been extended to other geological challenges faced by society, such as fracking for oil and gas development, radioactive waste disposal, carbon capture and storage, geologic hazards, and deep-well injection of wastewater.

The lay public is frequently uninformed or misinformed about the complex scientific and technical challenges that accompany these issues. This problem is typically coupled with a general lack of knowledge about subsurface geology. The SLO seeks to alleviate this problem through a variety of public participation strategies to engage with citizens, communities, and stakeholder groups. Through this process, geoscientists can develop an understanding of public knowledge and concerns.

Presenters

Getting Past Go, Larry Cerrillo, CPG, Collaborative Problem Solving, Evergreen, Colorado

Changing the Public Tone on Fracking, Mark Truax, Director of Operations and Coalitions, Coloradans for Responsible Energy Development (CRED), Denver, Colorado

Coloradans for Responsible Energy Development (CRED) was created in September 2013 to help educate the general public about the energy, economic and environmental benefits of safe and responsible oil and natural gas development.  Our message is simple and clear: get the facts on fracking first before you make a decision. In the last year, CRED has had tremendous success with educating the public about the positive benefits from oil and natural gas development. Mark Truax, Director of Operations and Coalitions for CRED will present on how CRED has accomplished this and discuss the plans for the future of the education effort.

Politics, Papers and a Gas Powered Economy, Frank McNulty, Spencer Fane Britt & Browne LLP, Attorney at Law, Denver, Colorado

The history of land use planning in Colorado and why local control is so strong, Karen Berry, State Geologist, Colorado Geological Survey, Golden, Colorado

Keynote Luncheon Speaker

What's EQ Got To Do With It, Kari Knutson, Knutson Consulting, Denver, Colorado

What’s EQ Got To Do With It?

Emotional Intelligence (EQ) is a term that has become quite popular in the last few years but do we really know what it means or how to use it?

Many people want to know why EQ is so important and also how to use it to be more successful.  In the case of conference attendees, you might be asking, “What does EQ have to do with my work?”

We will answer these questions and talk about the role of EQ in our daily lives.  We will look at the impact of using EQ both personally and professionally, and discuss how it can profoundly affect the quality of your interactions, your productivity, and your ability to successfully communicate.

You will leave with a better understanding of what EQ is and what it is not.  In addition, you will be able to analyze some of your most important relationships and answer the question, ”What’s EQ got to do with it?”

Colorado’s New Horizon: Winning the Battle in Our Own Backyard, Doug Hock, Manager, Media Relations, Encana Services Co. Ltd., Denver, Colorado

Educational Challenges with Social Licensing, Dr. Robert W. Blair, CPG, Consultant, Durango, Colorado

Social Licensing assumes a well-informed or gullible electorate. Neither likely exists. To be well-informed often requires a strong background in math and science, access to reliable information, and ability to recognize, differentiate and process through strong advocacy arguments to generate an informed opinion. The process should begin in grade school. Examples from southwestern Colorado.

Integrating Community Relations at Every Phase of Development, Katelyn Roberts, EIS Solutions, Denver, Colorado

Why Stakeholder Assessment and Multi-Stakeholder Governance Matter, Cecilia Dalupan, Sustainable Development Studies Group, Denver, Colorado

Making discoveries, forming relationships: Newmont’s approach to exploration, Matt King, Sr. Manager for Social Responsibility, Newmont Mining Corporation, Greenwood Village, Colorado

Hard Rock Mining Communication Strategies: Case Histories of Strategies that Worked — and One that Did Not, Debra W. Struhsacker, Senior Vice President, Pershing Gold Corporation, Lovelock, Nevada

The moral case for fossil fuels, Amy Oliver Cooke, Independence Institute, Executive Vice President, Director, Energy Policy Center, Denver, Colorado

Networking Reception will be held after the last presentation.

Social Licensing: Achieving Public Support

November 10, 2014 - Monday
8:30 am - 5:00 pm
(networking reception from 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm)

Where: Doubletree by Hilton Denver-Stapleton North, 4040 Quebec Street, Denver, CO 80216. A block of rooms have been reserved at a rate of $74 a night for single/double occupancy. For hotel reservations call 1-800-222-TREE or (303) 262-7735, and be sure to use the group code ‘AIPG’ to receive the discounted conference rate of $74 per night, which will be honored until 10/19/14. The hotel offers complimentary parking, complimentary internet in the guest rooms, and complimentary shuttle service to/from DIA.

Program: The term “Social License to Operate” (SLO) was originally adopted for use by the Canadian mining industry in the late 1990s, and referred to the concept that social permission was needed for a mining company to conduct its operations, for example from local communities or indigenous people. Since then, the premise of the SLO has been extended to other geological challenges faced by society, such as fracking for oil and gas development, radioactive waste disposal, carbon capture and storage, geologic hazards, and deep-well injection of wastewater.

The lay public is frequently uninformed or misinformed about the complex scientific and technical challenges that accompany these issues. This problem is typically coupled with a general lack of knowledge about subsurface geology. The SLO seeks to alleviate this problem through a variety of public participation strategies to engage with citizens, communities, and stakeholder groups. Through this process, geoscientists can develop an understanding of public knowledge and concerns.

Conference Registration Includes

Program, Continental Breakfast, Lunch, Breaks, Networking Reception

Registration

$250 AIPG Member | $295 Non-Member | $35 Student

Sponsors

$150 includes a full one-page color ad or company summary in the conference program and your company name and logo added to our website with a link to yours or $350 includes one complimentary conference registration, a full one-page color ad or company summary included in the conference program, your company name and logo added to our website with a link to yours, and marketing materials may be handed out to registrants.

Exhibitor Booth

$350 includes 10’ x 10’ exhibit booth, one complimentary conference registration, a full one-page color ad or company summary in the conference program, your company name and logo added to our website with a link to yours, and marketing materials may be handed out to registrants.

Sponsors

Anadarko

Anadarko Petroleum Corp.
1099 18th Street, Suite 1800
Denver, CO 80202
(720) 929-6488
Alex Hohmann - alex.hohmann@anadarko.com
www.anadarko.com

Bill Barrett Corp.

Bill Barrett Corporation
33105 WCR 33
Greeley, CO 80631
(970) 270-2853
Doug Dennison - ddennison@billbarrettcorp.com
www.billbarrettcorp.com

PDC Energy

PDC Energy
1775 Sherman Street, Suite 3000
Denver, CO 80203
(303) 831-3977
Susan Fakharzadeh - Susan.Fakharzadeh@pdce.com
www.pdce.com

Geopropel
GeoPropel, LLC
16225 Park Ten Place, Suite 500
Houston, TX 77407
(281) 912-3612
Aditya Tadakaluru - aditya@geopropel.com
www.geopropel.com

calfrac

Calfrac Well Services
717 17th St., Suite 1445
Denver, CO 80202
(303) 293-2931
Dale Larsen - dlarsen@calfrac.com
www.calfrac.com

Exhibitor

Denver Petroleum Club

Denver Petroleum Club
P.O. Box 13226
Denver, CO 80201
(720) 663-9070
Sally Hallingstad, Executive Director
sally@denverpetroleumclub.com
www.denverpetroleumclub.com


The American Institute of Professional Geologists (AIPG), founded in 1963, is the largest association dedicated to promoting geology as a profession. It presently has more than 7,000 members in the U.S. and abroad, organized into 36 regional Sections. The Institute adheres to the principles of professional responsibility and public service and is the only international organization that certifies the competence and ethical conduct of geological scientists in all branches of the science with members employed in industry, government, and academia. AIPG emphasizes competence, integrity and ethics. AIPG is an advocate for the profession and communicates regularly to federal and state legislators and agencies on matters pertaining to the geosciences.

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American Institute of Professional Geologists
National Headquarters
12000 Washington St., Suite 285
Thornton, Colorado 80241-3134
Phone: (303) 412-6205 | Fax: (303) 253-9220
aipg@aipg.orghttp://www.aipg.org     

                   
Upcoming AIPG Events:  

AIPG 2015 National Conference
September 19-22, 2015 | Anchorage, Alaska

Go to www.aipg.org for more information and to register online!